Public Domain Movies released in 1932

From IMDb: A young woman turns to Sherlock Holmes for protection when she's menaced by an escaped killer seeking missing treasure. However, when the woman is kidnapped, Holmes and Watson must penetrate the city's criminal underworld to find her.

You can find more information regarding this film on its IMDb page.

Broadway To Cheyenne starts off with a bunch of big city gangsters fighting and killing each other with Detective Breezy Kildare (Rex Bell) caught in the middle. When Breezy goes out west to the ranch where he grew up he runs into the same bunch of crooks. The gangsters are offering "protection" to the local ranchers. For the rest of the movie it's cowboys and gangsters.

Ken Maynard hears the cry of the weird masked "phantom" of Tombstone Canyon. The plot thickens when Maynard discovers a man with a key to his past has been murdered by the phantom.

From IMDb: "A native girl falls for a visitor to her island, but she's chosen to be sacrificed to the volcano god."

The eccentric millionaire Amos P. Stitch (Harry Myers) with a fondness for the drink hires the famous African explorer Jim Franklin (Walter Byron) to organize an expedition to the jungles of the Dark Continent. This strange expedition in search of animals to stock the millionaire's private zoo includes the German big game hunter Alec Bernouth (Adolph Milar) and a London cabbie (Ted Adams) with his cab to transport the millionaire in the jungle.

Murder at a seance.

A courtroom drama.

Naive, bookish Professor Post (Buster Keaton) inherits a huge amount of money and decides that now he can afford to go out and enjoy life

An adaptation of Bedřich Smetana's opera The Bartered Bride. Set in 19th century Bohemia, the matchmaker Kezal wants to bring the mayor's daughter Marie and the rich landowner's son Wenzel together. Both of them, however, have already fallen in love with someone else. The endearing characters, a whimsical storyline and quiet humor combine with catchy tunes, a pastoral setting and fluid camera work. A last hurrah in the wanning days of Weimar cinema, by non-other than Max Ophüls.

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