Public Domain Movies released in 1925

The first film adaptation of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's classic novel about a land where prehistoric creatures still roam.

A tough slum girl, Annabelle 'Little Annie' Rooney (Mary Pickford), faces a crisis of the heart when the boy she loves (William Haines) is accused of shooting her cop father (Walter James). Her brother (Gordon Griffith) stalks the accused slayer and finally shoots him down in the street. Annabelle rushes to the hospital and offers her blood for a life-saving transfusion, even though she thinks she'll die.

Valentino

1925 directed by Clarence Brown starring Rudolph Valentino as Drubovsky, Vilma Banky as Mascha, Louise Dresser as the Czarina, Albert Conti as Kuschka and James A. Marcus as Kryilla. After witnessing the daring rescue of a runaway carriage by the dashing, young Lieutenant Dubrovski, (Valentino), a smitten Czarina orders him to attend a private dinner.

A mad, disfigured composer seeks love with a lovely young opera singer. - IMDB Description

Vienna in the biggest depression, directly after WW1. In a slum, Lila Leid (Tamara Geva), the wife of lawyer Leid (Alexander Murski) is murdered, Egon, secretary of one of Leid's clients is arrested. He was with her, and had her necklace, because he needed some money for his own stock exchange deals. The same deal brings poverty to ex-government official Rumfort (Jaro Fürth), his daughter Greta (Greta Garbo), who also has lost her job, tries to prostituting herself to get some money and food.

At the Opera of Paris, a mysterious phantom threatens a famous lyric singer, Carlotta and thus forces her to give up her role (Marguerite in Faust) for unknown Christine Daae. Christine meets this phantom (a masked man) in the catacombs, where he lives.

The first film adaptation of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's classic novel about a land where prehistoric creatures still roam.You can find more information regarding this film on its IMDb page.

Considered one of the most important films in the history of silent pictures, as well as possibly Eisenstein's greatest work, Battleship Potemkin brought Eisenstein's theories of cinema art to the world in a powerful showcase; his emphasis on montage, his stress of intellectual contact, and his treatment of the mass instead of the individual as the protagonist. The film tells the story of the mutiny on the Russian ship Prince Potemkin during the 1905 uprising.

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