Film-Noir

A society reporter (Leslie Brooks) keeps herself in the headlines by marrying a series of wealthy men, all of whom die under mysterious circumstances

A reporter hears that a famous actress is dying in a hospital after being hit by a car. She goes to the hospital to interview the actress, who tells the reporter that her wealthy fiance, who was killed in an accident several years before, was actually murdered. Before long the reporter finds herself in a web of corruption, mental illness and murder.

"Man is involved in two freakish accidents that make him look like a murderer. Poverty row masterwork that is the most precise elucidation of the noir theme of explicit fatalism." - noir expert Spencer Selby | Cast: Tom Neal, Ann Savage, Claudia Drake, Edmund MacDonald. | A B-movie, it was shot in six days. The film, budgeted for $89,000 and ended up costing $117,000 to make.

"Middle-aged farmer goes to extreme lengths to protect the dark secret associated with a deserted house on his property. Murky psychological thriller with resonant settings and an emotive Miklos Rozsa score." - noir expert Spencer Selby

A psychologically distraught woman is committed to a private sanitarium by the man whom she witnessed commit a murder. - IMDB Description

A lawyer wins an a acquittal for his client, a woman accused of murder. After the verdict, he finds out that she indeed did commit the murder and manipulated him to win her acquittal.

A film noir shocker, based on the story Nightmare by Cornell Woorlich, in which average Joe Vince Grayson (De Forest Kelley) dreams he murders someone and wakes up to find it may not have been a dream. This is worth it for the clever plot twists alone.

German director Fritz Lang is best known for the highly influential films from relatively early in his career, especially Metropolis (1927) and M (1931). But he also had a brief Hollywood heyday during the mid 1940s, when he made some of his best films. Scarlet Street has been claimed by film noir. This attribution is understandable. The lighting is dark, with heavy use of shadows. The characters are all shady as well. Kitty is certainly a femme fatale, although hints are dropped that she is an inherently decent person who has become completely corrupted by Johnny.

Set Connecticut after World War II, The Stranger is a cat and mouse game between Wilson (Edward G. Robinson), a member of the Allied War Crimes Commission and Franz Kindler (Orson Welles), a Nazi who has assumed the false identity of Dr. Charles Rankin. To complete his new intelligentsia disguise, Kindler marries Mary Longstreet, daughter of a Supreme Court justice.

Curiosity propels two teens, Meg and Nath (Allene Roberts and Lon McCallister) to explore an apparently abandoned house in the countryside. Of course they are warned to stay away from the secluded place.

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