An old-fashioned but excellent melodrama film directed by D. W. Griffith.

From the Wikipedia entry for "The Conquering Power": The_Conquering_Power.jpg "The Conquering Power is a silent film made in 1921, directed by Rex Ingram and starring Rudolph Valentino, Alice Terry, and Ralph Lewis.

Avant-garde adaptation of the Oscar Wilde play. Rumors at the time of its production that the cast was all gay doomed its success with the mainstream public. However, the film is now perceived as a landmark of artistic cinema with its spectacle of striking visual images. With English intertitles and German subtitles.

WWII recruitment film aimed at African Americans. The film opens with an African American minister in church telling his flock why they should join the armed forces to fight the Nazis. We see historical re-enactments of African Americans as valued participants in US armed conflicts dating from the American Revolution. The balance of the film deals with the African American experience within the present war effort, the conditions of their living and training, with special attention paid to the respect and dignity they will have.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0011656/ nota: 8.3 in IMDB ^^ Is a great film!!!

1922 (public domain) silent version of the classic, with Douglas Fairbanks, Alan Hale and many others. Visit the IMDB page for this movie.

Abbott and Costello's musical version of the classic fairytale. More information can be found on this IMDB page.

No more uploads I was very satisfied with FTP uploading at archive.org. I was able to see exactly how much of the upload had been completed. I was able to see the rate at which the upload was progressing. And, perhaps most important of all, I was able to resume an interrupted upload. In other words, if I had uploaded 90% of a file when the connection was lost, all I had to do was reconnect and upload the remaining 10%. The programmers at archive.org have eliminated the best way of uploading, uploading via FTP. They have decided to force everyone to use an inferior, cruder method.

Sita is a goddess separated from her beloved Lord and husband Rama. Nina is an animator whose husband moves to India, then dumps her by email. Three hilarious shadow puppets narrate both ancient tragedy and modern comedy in this beautifully animated interpretation of the Indian epic Ramayana. Set to the 1920's jazz vocals of Annette Hanshaw, Sita Sings the Blues earns its tagline as "the Greatest Break-Up Story Ever Told."

In a classic poverty-row noir, the protagonist struggles helplessly in the grip of inexorable fate. Currently rated 7.4 at the IMDB. This was the first poverty-row film chosen by the Library of Congress for its National Film Registry, in 1992. Don't miss it. The copy you find here is sharper than the two that have already been uploaded. And the mpeg2 file contains nav packets, so you can load it into DVDAuthorGUI (a free program) and quickly create a DVD to watch on your television.

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